One Shoe

We are participating in a joint garage sale with some other families from our Financial Peace University (Dave Ramsey) class.  I didn’t think we’d have too much stuff to sell but that’s before we made a trek into the attic late one night.

We haven’t added anything to the attic in probably a decade so I guess I thought there just wasn’t that much up there.  Boy was I wrong!  We found oodles and oodles of stuff – only some of which had been destroyed by nesting mice, other critters, and the passage of time.

It cracked us up to find a huge box labeled “Garage Sale”.  But the best find, by far, was the group of 3 or 4 tubs and boxes of Jane’s baby clothes.  Everything from tiny little newborn up through about 3T.  And some cute little shoes!

20140712_074959They were lined up so nicely at the bottom of the box, each with their match… except for that lone white Ked.  And here’s what I love about my kids.  Half joking, I held it up in the air and called out, “Who wants this shoe?!”

Quick as lightning, Daryl’s hand shot up in the air: “I do!”

This caused Jane to retire her own hand that was making a belated attempt to claim it.

As I handed it to my ten year old son, his face beamed and he said, “I’m going to paint it.  It’s going to be so cool!”

“I was going to plant a tree in it,” Jane said forlornly.

“Well, maybe you can plant the tree in it when he’s done painting it,” I said, thoroughly impressed that my kids were showing their Destination Imagination credentials by so quickly finding a use for a lone tiny baby shoe.

 

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Common Sense Takes a Hike

There are certain things that seem like common sense to a parent. These are things you don’t think you ever actually need to explain to your child. Especially if your child has been identified as “Gifted and Talented”. And it’s not really like you think, “Well, I don’t need to tell her about this. I’m sure she understands.” It just seems so plainly obvious that you never even think of mentioning it. Like this classic for Jane:

You should never microwave your jacket.

See? That’s just not something I ever thought I needed to say. Nevertheless, it would have saved a jacket and a microwave if I had thought to say it. I thought that maybe the jacket was an isolated incident, but sadly, I was mistaken.

On two separate occasions recently, both Jane’s father and I have had to speak this gem:

Don’t take your cell phone with you in the shower.

Yes, I would have thought that it would be quite evident that water and electronics don’t mix. Apparently, though, the need to listen to her tunes overrode common sense. Twice.

And at the conclusion of Sunday’s volleyball game, my husband found himself saying the following words:

You need to tie your shoes when participating in a sport.

Now, don’t misunderstand. This isn’t a simple matter of a shoe coming untied and a busy child failing to notice or, noticing, failing to stop and tie. No, this is a child that has been insisting she needs new shoes for volleyball because she is getting blisters and having other problems. Turns out, she’s not tying her shoes. She’s merely tucking the laces inside. This is a common teen dressing habit for school. You would think that common sense would clearly indicate, however, that this habit is not appropriate on the volleyball court. But, alas, it does not.

This makes me wonder what words are waiting to be spoken next.

A Matter of Etiquette

Our bathroom, the never-ending remodeling project, does not have a mirror or a sink. This is why I found myself in the kids’ bathroom drying my hair while Jane brushed her teeth.

As she rinsed her toothbrush, she dropped it into the recently spit toothpaste at the bottom of the sink, just as she was turning off the water. She grimaced at me slightly and then turned to wipe it clean on the washcloth hanging on the towel rack behind us.

“Jane! You should have rinsed it off before you wiped it on a towel that other people might use to wipe their faces!”

“What? You mean the washcloth that I used to clean my shoes?”

With eyes wide in disbelief, I said, “If you used that to clean your shoes, you shouldn’t have hung it up on the towel rack where other people might use it.”

“Oh,” she replied, looking slightly abashed. She quickly pulled it off the rack. And then turned to the mirror and… wiped the toothpaste from the corners of her mouth with it. Grinning at me as she did so.

And all this time, I thought it was boys that were supposed to be disgusting.